Buzzword Bingo: World Heritage
World Heritage

on this page: buzzwords
related: parks, unesco, heritage, icomos, intangible heritage, world heritage day, 41st Session of the World Heritage Committee
hashtag: #WorldHeritage
editing: http://planeta.com/worldheritage

World Heritage is a map of the our planet's cultural interdependence.

Events

July 2017 41st Session of the World Heritage Committee (Kraków, Poland)
July 10-20, 2016 40th Session of the World Heritage Committee (Istanbul, Turkey)
June 26 - July 8, 2015 39th Session of the World Heritage Committee (Bonn, Germany)

RSS

World Heritage - Google News

Twitter

@IUCN
@UNESCO
@DermotOz
@CongresoBPPM
@WH_Watch
@ICCROM
@Faces4Heritage
@ARCWH
@Global_Heritage
@WorldMonuments



Key Links

International Council on Monuments and Sites
World Heritage Center
http://whc.unesco.org/en/news/
World Heritage Alliance
World Heritage Alliance Online Learning Center
World Hertitage Outlook
World Heritage Tour
Friends of World Heritage
Convention Text
http://whc.unesco.org/en/interactive-map
http://whc.unesco.org/en/254
http://whc.unesco.org/en/newproperties

Preparing World Heritage Nominations

New Database shows how conservation efforts are faring in UNESCO #WorldHeritage Sites
http://whc.unesco.org/en/soc

Managing Tourism at World Heritage Sites (PDF)

The website (www.worldheritageoutlook.iucn.org) features an interactive map and intuitive search filters, as an easy way to find valuable information. The conservation outlook of World Heritage sites can be searched by region, criteria of Outstanding Universal Value, rating, threat or benefit.

Climate Change and World Heritage

http://planeta.com/1706coral
https://theconversation.com/the-un-is-slowly-warming-to-the-task-of-protecting-world-heritage-sites-from-climate-change-80270
http://blog.ucsusa.org/adam-markham/new-world-heritage-sites-already-under-threat-from-climate-change


World Heritage Buzzword Bingo

Amendment - App - Authenticity - Awareness - Boundaries - Buffer Zone - Civil Society - Climate Change - Community - Community Involvement - Comparative Analysis - Consensus - Conservation - Criteria - Cultural Landscape - Culture - Decision - Deferral - Delegate - Dossier - Field Trip - Floor - Governance - Heritage - Hotspot - Icomos - Iconic - Inscription - Intangible Heritage - Integrity - IUCN - Landscape - Management - Mission - Mixed - Modification - Natural Landscape - New Properties - No Go Zones - Nomination - Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) - PADDD (protected areas downgraded, downsized or degazetted) - Property - Protection - Rapporteur - Recommendation - Refer - Referral - Site - State Party - Sustainable Development - UNESCO - World Heritage


World Heritage App 03.2014

App

UNESCO World Heritage
@aimermedia@unesco

Emblem

The World Heritage emblem symbolizes the interdependence of cultural and natural properties: the central square is a form created by people and the circle represents nature.

No Go Zones

see: nogo

World Heritage Committee The 21 States Parties of the current World Heritage Committee are the following: Algeria, Colombia, Croatia, Finland, Germany, India, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Senegal, Serbia, Turkey, Viet Nam According to the World Heritage Convention, a Committee member's term of office is for six years, but most States Parties choose voluntarily to be Members of the Committee for only four years, in order to give other States Parties an opportunity to be on the Committee. All Members elected during the two last General Assemblies (2011 and 2013) have voluntarily decided to reduce their period of term of office from six to four years. The World Heritage Committee meets once a year. It is responsible for the implementation of the World Heritage Convention, defines the use of the World Heritage Fund and allocates financial assistance upon requests from States Parties. It has the final say on whether a property is inscribed on the World Heritage List. It examines reports on the state of conservation of inscribed properties and asks States Parties to take action when properties are not being properly managed. It also decides on the inscription or deletion of properties on the List of World Heritage in Danger.

Danger

http://whc.unesco.org/en/danger

World Heritage and Indigenous Peoples

world-heritage-convention-and-indigenous-peoples

World Heritage Watch

http://www.world-heritage-watch.org - @WH_Watch

Case Studies on the Wiki

cape york, australia

Recommended Listening

When the shine goes off tourism icons - What happens when natural or man-made attractions lose their tourism lustre?

Historic farming systems have tourism appeal

Latitudes: a song cycle - The 'music' of three UNESCO World Heritage sites plays across three continents - from a dry lakebed in the near outback, to a pilgrimage route in Japan, to a glacial valley in the north of Italy.
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/these-iconic-natural-sites-may-become-damaged-beyond-repair-we-are-blame-1604020


2014 Headlines

Australian World Heritage: keeping the outstanding exceptional
Decision on status of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef deferred until 2015 - UNESCO
http://motherboard.vice.com/read/australia-wants-to-log-in-a-world-heritage-rainforest
Unesco to rule on Tasmania forest and Great Barrier Reef

2014

June 15 - 25 World Heritage Committee in Doha, Qatar. Details

Livestreaming:
http://new.livestream.com/accounts/2255445/events/3100333




2013 Headlines

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/media-services/single-view/news/twelve_new_members_elected_to_world_heritage_committee

World Heritage for Cape York
Peninsula People's Forum to discuss world heritage listing in Cape York Peninsula 11.2012

Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/photos/unesco_de

Pinterest

unesco-world-heritage-sites

Wikipedia

World Heritage Committee
World_Heritage_Site

Elsewhere on the Web

https://furnacejournal.wordpress.com/ourunesco

Questions regarding consultation (editing)

I believe people can write the World Heritage Center (Centre) as part of UNESCO in Paris, and there concern will be addressed there - since the "committee" is technically the group of 21 nations who comprise the actual committee that meets once a year -- but the WHC is their administrative -- "home" -- for want of a better word. Check out http://whc.unesco.org/en/world-heritage-centre/ for addresses generally, and for other sub-offices that work on particular issues. I believe that would be the best way for a citizen of a particular country, not aligned with a particular environmental group that is part of IUCN or WCPA or something similar, to contact the "committee."

World Heritage Cities

http://www.ovpm.org
http://www.ciudadespatrimonio.org
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organization_of_World_Heritage_Cities

Spotlight: World Heritage in the USA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_World_Heritage_Sites_in_the_United_States
http://www.state.gov/p/io/unesco/c48319.htm
http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/&search=&searchSites=&search_by_country=&search_yearinscribed=&type=cultural&themes=&media=®ion=&criteria_restrication=&order=&&order=country
Recreation.gov

World Heritage Convention?
The Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage is an international agreement that was adopted by the General Conference of UNESCO in 1972. It is based on the premise that certain places on Earth are of outstanding universal value and should therefore form part of the common heritage of humankind. The countries who ratify the Convention (States Parties) have become part of an international community, united in a common mission to identify and safeguard our world's most outstanding natural and cultural heritage. While fully respecting the national sovereignty, and without prejudice to property rights provided by national legislation, the States Parties recognize that the protection of the World Heritage is the duty of the international community as a whole. For the whole Convention text please visit http://whc.unesco.org/en/conventiontex

What are the legal implications of the Convention? The UNESCO World Heritage Convention is a treaty that has become, over the past 40 years, the foremost international legal tool in support of the conservation of the world's cultural and natural heritage. Today, 191 countries (called States Parties) have ratified the Convention, making it an almost universally accepted set of principles and framework of action. For more information about the Convention please visit http://whc.unesco.org/en/convention/

How is a site inscribed on the List? A site goes through a nomination process before being considered for inscription by the World Heritage Committee. A site can be proposed for inscription only by the country in which the property is located. For more information about the nomination process please visit http://whc.unesco.org/en/nominations

What are the criteria for nominating a site? To be included on the World Heritage List, sites must be of outstanding universal value and meet at least one out of the following ten selection criteria. Selection criteria 1. to represent a masterpiece of human creative genius; 2. to exhibit an important interchange of human values, over a span of time or within a cultural area of the world, on developments in architecture or technology, monumental arts, town-planning or landscape design; 3. to bear a unique or at least exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition or to a civilization which is living or which has disappeared; 4. to be an outstanding example of a type of building, architectural or technological 5. to be an outstanding example of a traditional human settlement, land-use, or sea-use which is representative of a culture (or cultures), or human interaction with the environment especially when it has become vulnerable under the impact of irreversible change; 6. to be directly or tangibly associated with events or living traditions, with ideas, or with beliefs, with artistic and literary works of outstanding universal significance. (The Committee considers that this criterion should preferably be used in conjunction with other criteria); 7. to contain superlative natural phenomena or areas of exceptional natural beauty and aesthetic importance; 8. to be outstanding examples representing major stages of earth's history, including the record of life, significant on-going geological processes in the development of landforms, or significant geomorphic or physiographic features; 9. to be outstanding examples representing significant on-going ecological and biological processes in the evolution and development of terrestrial, fresh water, coastal and marine ecosystems and communities of plants and animals; 10. to contain the most important and significant natural habitats for in-situ conservation of biological diversity, including those containing threatened species of outstanding universal value from the point of view of science or conservation.

Embedded Tweets








World Heritage Day

April 18 is world heritage day

Europe

nov-13-burren-community-charter-resource-clinic-and-discussion

USA

http://www.nps.gov/oia/topics/worldheritage/worldheritage.htm
http://worldheritagematters.blogspot.com

Astronomy
Astronomy and World Heritage Thematic Initiative
http://whc.unesco.org/en/events/1239

World Heritage Outlook

http://cectalksnature.org/members-in-action-articles/positive-outlook-for-two-thirds-of-natural-world-heritage-sites
https://portals.iucn.org/library/node/44889
https://portals.iucn.org/library/sites/library/files/documents/2014-039.pdf
worldheritageoutlook.iucn.org.

http://40whc2016.istanbul/media-and-press/press-material/


WHC
Three main functions of the committee are to identify and inscribe newly nominated cultural and natural properties on the World Heritage List; to monitor the state of conservation of properties inscribed on the list and to examine requests for international assistance financed by the World Heritage Fund.



World Heritage Basic Facts


1 What is World Heritage?

World Heritage is the designation for places on Earth that are of outstanding universal value to humanity and as such, have been inscribed on the World Heritage List to be protected for future generations to appreciate and enjoy. Places as diverse and unique as the Pyramids of Egypt, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, Galápagos Islands in Ecuador, the Taj Mahal in India, the Grand Canyon in the USA, or the Acropolis in Greece are examples of the 1031 natural and cultural places inscribed on the World Heritage List to date.

More about World Heritage http://whc.unesco.org/pg.cfm?cid=160

2 What does it mean for a site to be inscribed on the List?

Once a country signs the Convention, and has sites inscribed on the World Heritage List, the resulting prestige often helps raise awareness among citizens and governments for heritage preservation. Greater awareness leads to a general rise in the level of the protection and conservation given to heritage properties. A country may also receive financial assistance and expert advice from the World Heritage Committee to support activities for the preservation of its sites.

3 What is the World Heritage Convention?

The Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage is an international agreement that was adopted by the General Conference of UNESCO in 1972. It is based on the premise that certain places on Earth are of outstanding universal value and should therefore form part of the common heritage of humankind. The countries who ratify the Convention (States Parties) have become part of an international community, united in a common mission to identify and safeguard our world's most outstanding natural and cultural heritage. While fully respecting the national sovereignty, and without prejudice to property rights provided by national legislation, the States Parties recognize that the protection of the World Heritage is the duty of the international community as a whole.

For the whole Convention text please visit http://whc.unesco.org/en/conventiontext/

4 What are the legal implications of the Convention?

The UNESCO World Heritage Convention is a treaty that has become, over the past 44 years, the foremost international legal tool in support of the conservation of the world's cultural and natural heritage. Today, 192 countries (called States Parties) have ratified the Convention, making it an almost universally accepted set of principles and framework of action.

For more information about the Convention please visit http://whc.unesco.org/en/convention/

5 How is a site inscribed on the List?

A site goes through a nomination process before being considered for inscription by the World Heritage Committee. A site can be proposed for inscription only by the country in which the property is located.

For more information about the nomination process please visit http://whc.unesco.org/en/nominations

6 Who nominates sites?

Countries (or States Parties) submit nomination proposals to the World Heritage Committee. If the Committee determines, based on the recommendations of its Advisory Bodies (ICCROM, ICOMOS and IUCN), that the nomination meets at least one of the necessary criteria, then the property is inscribed on the World Heritage List. In general, the Committee adds about 25-30 sites per year to the list. Today there are 1031 sites on the list, located in 163 countries around the world.

For more information please refer to the Operational Guidelines http://whc.unesco.org/en/guidelines/

7 What are the criteria for nominating a site?

To be included on the World Heritage List, sites must be of outstanding universal value and meet at least one out of the following ten selection criteria.

Selection criteria


  1. to represent a masterpiece of human creative genius;
  2. to exhibit an important interchange of human values, over a span of time or within a cultural area of the world, on developments in architecture or technology, monumental arts, town-planning or landscape design;
  3. to bear a unique or at least exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition or to a civilization which is living or which has disappeared;
  4. to be an outstanding example of a traditional human settlement, land-use, or sea-use which is representative of a culture (or cultures), or human interaction with the environment especially when it has become vulnerable under the impact of irreversible change;
  5. to be an outstanding example of a traditional human settlement, land-use, or sea-use which is representative of a culture (or cultures), or human interaction with the environment especially when it has become vulnerable under the impact of irreversible change;
  6. to be directly or tangibly associated with events or living traditions, with ideas, or with beliefs, with artistic and literary works of outstanding universal significance. (The Committee considers that this criterion should preferably be used in conjunction with other criteria);
  7. to contain superlative natural phenomena or areas of exceptional natural beauty and aesthetic importance;
  8. to be outstanding examples representing major stages of earth's history, including the record of life, significant on-going geological processes in the development of landforms, or significant geomorphic or physiographic features;
  9. to be outstanding examples representing significant on-going ecological and biological processes in the evolution and development of terrestrial, fresh water, coastal and marine ecosystems and communities of plants and animals;
  10. to contain the most important and significant natural habitats for in-situ conservation of biological diversity, including those containing threatened species of outstanding universal value from the point of view of science or conservation.

8 Who owns a site once it’s inscribed on the World Heritage List?

The site is the property of the country on whose territory it is located, but it is considered in the interest of the international community to protect the site for future generations. Its protection and preservation becomes a concern of the international World Heritage community as a whole.

9 Partners in the protection of World Heritage

The World Heritage Committee and UNESCO promote a partnership approach to nomination, management and monitoring. It provides a significant contribution to the protection of World Heritage properties and the implementation of the Convention. Partners in the protection and conservation of World Heritage can be individuals and other stakeholders, especially local communities, indigenous peoples, governmental, non-governmental and private organizations and owners who have an interest and involvement in the conservation and management of a World Heritage property. In 2015, the General Assembly of States Parties adopted a policy to integrate a sustainable development perspective within the processes of the World Heritage Convention.