indiweek2016

Indigenous Peoples Week in Khanty language

August 8-14 Indigenous Peoples Week 2016 #ipw6

on this page: partners, participants, recommended listening, reading, 4 winds
related: indigenous, indiweek, 2016
slideshare: indiweek2016
registration: eventbrite
facebook: IPW6 and Indigenous Tourism
storify: ipw
flickr: ipw6 artwork
planeta.com: Four Winds Recognition
editing: http://planeta.com/indiweek2016

Planeta.com - We are pleased to share with the world a recap of the 2016 Indigenous Peoples Week.

This was our sixth annual celebration of social web storytelling about Indigenous peoples and tourism around the four corners of the world - Indigenous Peoples Week took place August 8-14. The objective is to help raise awareness of Indigenous tourism options around the world and improve digital literacy skills among Indigenous friends. Partners in this endeavor are Nutti Sámi Siida, TIME Unlimited, Madidi Jungle Ecolodge and The Travel Word.

Just because the week is over does not mean our conversation has concluded. (El hecho de que se termine la semana no significa que nuestra conversación ha concluido.)

Reminder: Keep an eye on the Facebook event page

And think of what should be shared during the next Indigenous Peoples Week -- August 8-13, 2017.

Four Winds Recognition

We made a call to the four corners and four winds of the Earth. We wanted to know the people and organizations doing great work with Indigenous Tourism. The Four Winds Recognition is selected by Planeta.com, Nutti Sámi Siida, TIME Unlimited, Madidi Jungle Ecolodge and The Travel Word.

Congratulations to the recipients of this year's Four Winds Recognition:

Personal Recognition
Deborah McLaren @getlocalflavor
Keith Henry

Institutional Recognition
Six Nations Tourism, Ontario, Canada - Facebook
@sntourism

Native Education College has been delivering post-secondary training in Indigenous tourism for more than 20 years - Facebook
https://twitter.com/NEC_Vancouver

Timeline

August 22-September 10
Submissions will be accepted, including self-nominations. Don't be shy! We'll ask about good practices and lessons learned from mistakes.

September 10-25
IPW partners and friends will review the nominees and edit the formal announcement

September 25
Last call for edits
Also Ceillhe's birthday!

September 27
World Tourism Day

See
http://planeta.com/1608fourwinds


References

UPDATE: A Framework for Indigenous Tourism: International Guidelines and Human Rights
-Submitted by Deborah McLaren
https://twitter.com/getlocalflavor

Apps
What good are old stories if they are not shared? Never Alone Game Trailer https://vimeo.com/92000406



What were the lessons learned from mistakes
Canada has recently taken direct action towards reconciliation with First Nations communities. As a part of the Truth and Reconciliation commission organizations across the country committed to involving First Nations communities directly in events, such as the Pan Am Games, as host communities -- offering First Nations direct participation in showcasing indigenous cultural traditions of their traditional territories. Six Nations was host to the 2015 Pan Am Games and as a result delegates and athletes from around the world were able to experience the culture and history of the Haudenosaunee/Iroquois people in an authentic way. Six Nations Tourism was a strong partner in organizing those authentic experiences. Six Nations was also host this year to the Two Row on the Grand experience bringing awareness to the treaty relationship between the Haudenosaunee and European settlers and the history of the Grand River Tract where the Six Nations now reside. This was educational and helped foster positive relationships between indigenous and non-indigenous people in the new atmosphere of truth and reconciliation between First Nations and Canadians. It is difficult to attract students to the program, which offers specialized business training, as tourism continues to be seen as a service industry with low paying jobs.


Are there any other relevant web links? Two
Row on the Grand event article - https://tworowtimes.com/news/two-row-grand-sharing-responsibility/ Pan-Am Games cultural events article - https://tworowtimes.com/arts-and-culture/must-see-events-to-celebrate-arts-and-culture-this-weekend/ Six Nations Tourism new website -
http://www.sixnationstourism.cahttps ://aboriginalcanada.ca/corporate

facebook/NativeEd


How This Works

Everyone's invited to Indigenous Peoples Week. Our circle of conversation includes Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples around the world.

Talking points include biodiversity conservation, crafts, cultural heritage, food and literacy (traditional reading and writing and digital literacy -- the emerging read write culture).

Become social web literate by registering and participating on a few social web channels or apps. Be creative and make something. Be generous and encourage someone else. Applaud the work of others who inspire and be generous. Strive toward empathy - consider someone else's point of view. All of this may sound like a lot, but if you take the deep dive this week, you're to be surprised by what you learn and what you contribute.

Indigenous Peoples Week takes place everywhere at once, so consider the Planeta Wiki page — http://planeta.wikispaces.com/indiweek2016 — the conference hub before, during and after the week. We'll be making updates, adding links, embedding videos.

Preparing for a non-traditional conference, aka an unconference, can be challenging. Afterall, what happens now depends on you and others. Participants are asked to actively use the social web a way to create and share stories relevant to Indigenous travel and tourism. If you cannot create, curate! Highlights are featured on this wiki page as well as Storify — https://storify.com/ronmader/ipw — and Slideshare — http://www.slideshare.net/planeta/indiweek2016

Other venues for conversations during the week are the Facebook event page
https://www.facebook.com/events/1635740993418517
and Twitter (you don't have to be registered to see the hashtag)

Translating: Indigenous Peoples Week

Ayuuk: Kajpïn jayïta xyëëta (Santa María Ocotepec, Oaxaca)
Diné (Navajo): Diné Bikéyah Yikáá' Hólóonii Baa Ákohwiindzin
Erzya: прявтэрицянь раськетнень тарго
Estonian: Põlisrahvaste nädal
German: Die Woche der indigenen Völker
Finnish: Alkuperäiskansojen viikko
Hungarian: Bennszülöttek hete
Karelian: Alkuperäinen rahvahan netäli
Khanty: Там Лапт шоши Мир емн, хатл
Kven: Alkuasukkhaan viikko
Māori: Te Wiki o Te Tangata Whenua
Mari: Тӱп калык-влак арня
Maya: U k'iinilo'ob wayil kaajo'obe'
Russian: Hеделя коренных народов
Quechua: Sumaj wauky sumaj kuraj
Seto: Mustidsõ rahva nätäl
Spanish: Semana de los Pueblos Indígenas
Swedish: Ursprungsbefolkningarnas vecka
Udmurt: Выжы калыкъёслэн арнязы
Vadja: Alkurahvaijõ näteli


Twitter Polls

When traveling, how curious are you to engage / meetup with / appreciate local Indigenous culture?
Al viajar, qué curioso estás para engage / meetup / apreciar la cultura Indígena local?
Very curious
Somewhat curious
Not too curious




Recommended Reading

President Tsai apologizes to Indigenous peoples on behalf of government
En Teotitlán del Valle, tejen sueños con hilos de mariposa
Le preguntamos a un chamán veterano de la ayahuasca sobre los turistas estúpidos
Meet Aoife Finn: An Irishwoman who has never been to NZ but is mad about te reo - @aoinifh
Beyond Stone & Mortar: A Hopi Perspective on the Preservation of “Ruins” (& Culture)
The New Native American Tourism Push - outbounding
The Hadzabe in Tanzania - Transitions Abroad
#WeAreIndigenous - The Long Run

Ron's Blog
Registration is open

Storify

https://storify.com/ronmader/ipw

Questions

How can Indigenous tourism be developed in 2017?

Future Work

Financial sponsors are welcome to further the dialogue through innovative workshops and road trips. Please contact Ron Mader if you'd like to collaborate.

Special Request

One request from Ron Mader - please use email less. Indigenous Peoples Week is a public facing dialogue, so we'd like to see as much of the interaction and engagement in public.

Registered Participants

Ethan Gelber @thetravelword
Kristen Gill
Bill Hinchberger
Greg Hubbs @transabroad
Anders Kärrstedt @anderskarr
Kristin Lamoureux
Dženeta Marinska
Natalia Naranjo
Aivar Ruukel @Ruukel
Ben Salt
Joann Schmider
Neill Sperath @Timeunlimited
Lawrence Sticca
Lidia Twam
Kialo Winters @kialowinters @NavajoToursUSA

Be Engaged: How to participate online

Participants are asked to talk up the event via face-to-face conversations, online your own social web channels and to share / like / heart other people's #IPW6 posts. A little encouragement goes a long way! develop an online presentation to be shared during Indigenous Peoples Week. The presentation can be as simple or as complex as you'd like. It could be a YouTube video, a Flickr album, a YouTube playlist or a Slideshare presentation. Give us something we can embed and share with others. Participate in live public video before and during the week. Host or join local events. We'd love to see your #Periscope and #FacebookLIve videos. Suggest edits for Planeta.com, Change the world

Please register!
https://indiweek2016.eventbrite.com

Learn the social web by using Blogs, Facebook, Flickr, Google+, Periscope, Pinterest, Slideshare, Twitter, YouTube, Wikipedia to learn and share info about indigenous culture. Here's our checklist of social web challenges:
  • Blog: If you have your own blog, share stories about Indigenous cultures; if you don't have your own blog, add constructive comments to a blog of your choice!
  • Facebook: Introduce yourself on the event page; You can also recommend relevant groups and pages on Facebook
  • Flickr: Add a star or download or embed any of the artwork and posters from the IPW6 album. Create an account an upload a few photos of your work. There are a number of relevant groups. One of our favorites is the World Crafts Group open to Indigenous and non-Indigenous artisans. Another fave is the World Parks Group. The point is to share tips on Indigenous tourism, embedding the info within the photo description. A plus for Indigenous tourism businesses is the ease of creating a widget to share Flickr photos on websites and blogs. If you want to be generous, buy a gift account for someone whose work you respect.
  • Periscope: Take us on a virtural tour
  • Slideshare: Favorite the overview presentation; create a new presentation/slideshow about Indigenous culture.
  • Storify: Curate tweets or pictures
  • Twitter: Tweet about Indigenous culture and please tweet about this page! Ask others to invite Indigenous guides and artisans.
  • YouTube: Record your own video and introduce yourself and your interest in Indigenous tourism. If you are a tour company, show us something during the week. You can also curate a playlist to document Indigenous culture and traditional knowledge.
  • Wikipedia: Read or edit information about Indigenous culture.
  • Planeta Wiki: Editors are encouraged to update pages and embed information on Indigenous culture. Examples: Māori, Sámi, Finno-Ugric

Be Engaged: How to participate in the natural world

Try these suggestions all year round, but Indigenous Peoples Week is a great time to start!
  • Visit a museum: Seek out museums that work with Indigenous peoples. Bonus points if you share photos on Flickr in the World Museums Group.
  • Buy a craft: Support Indigenous artisans by purchasing an authentic Indigenous craft. Bonus points if you share photos on Flickr in the World Crafts Group.
  • Take a tour: There are many Indigenous guides and tour companies. Make a reservation.
  • Create supportive work spaces: Your workplace or school can support Indigenous Peoples Week. Support staff, students and colleagues with resources.
  • Schedule some Indigenous language time:Allocate time for an Indigenous language class.
  • Make a sign: Put bilingual signs up where you are - signs are a visible way of showing that Indigenous languages are valued.
Tip: If you create or attend a local event relevant to Indigenous peoples, let us know so we can amplify the message.

Measuring Engagement

Did you print a calendar or mark in a calendar with the dates for Indigenous Peoples Week marked out?
Have your tweets been favorited? Retweeted? Curated?
Are screenshots of your work featured online our Slideshare summary? https://www.slideshare.net/planeta/indiweek2016

Qualitative Engagement

What did you learn?
What did you enjoy?
Do you have any constructive feedback?

Slideshare

indiweek2016



Twitter

@timeunlimited @thetravelword @madidijungle @anderskarr @ronmader
@nihizaad @Ruukel @NavajoWeb @NavajoToursUSA @kialowinters

Partners

Partners for Indigenous Peoples Week 2016 are Nutti Sámi Siida, TIME Unlimited , Madidi Jungle Ecolodge and The Travel Word. Many of our partners are winners and finalists from the Indigenous Tourism and Biodiversity Website Award.

Partners are asked to
promote the event beforehand in face-to-face conversation, online your own social web channels and to share / like / heart other people's #ipw6 posts. A little encouragement goes a long way!

develop an online presentation to be shared during Indigenous Peoples Week. The presentation can be as simple or as complex as you'd like. It could be a YouTube video, a Flickr album, a YouTube playlist or a Slideshare presentation. Give us something we can embed and promote.

participate in live public video before and during the week. We'd love to have a conversation via hangout to introduce your work, your thoughts and questions.

edit the relevant pages on the Planeta Wiki. We'll be featuring our favorite pages and asking for updates during IPW.

host or join local events on the ground.

have fun. It's not working if we're not enjoying our conversation.

There is no payment required of partners outside of time and passion for this opportunity to broaden and deepen our conversation.

Specific ideas (much the same as above, but tweaked)
  • Blog: If you have your own blog, share stories about Indigenous Peoples Week.
  • Facebook: Introduce yourself on the event page; You can also recommend relevant groups and pages on Facebook
  • Flickr: Please copy, download, star, share, embed any of the posters and artwork from the IPW6 album. Create an account an upload a few photos of your work. There are a number of relevant groups. One of our favorites is the World Crafts Group open to Indigenous and non-indigenous artisans. Another fave is the World Parks Group. The point is to share tips on Indigenous tourism, embedding the info within the photo description. A plus for Indigenous tourism businesses is the ease of creating a widget to share Flickr photos on websites and blogs. If you want to be generous, buy a gift account for someone whose work you respect.
  • Periscope: Take us on a virtural tour
  • Slideshare: Favorite the overview presentation; create a new presentation/slideshow about Indigenous culture.
  • Storify: Curate tweets or pictures
  • Twitter: Tweet about Indigenous culture and please tweet about this page! Ask others to invite Indigenous guides and artisans.
  • YouTube: Record your own video and introduce yourself and your interest in Indigenous tourism. If you are a tour company, show us something during the week. You can also curate a playlist to document Indigenous culture and traditional knowledge.
  • Wikipedia: Read or edit information about Indigenous culture.
  • Planeta Wiki: Editors are encouraged to update pages and embed information on Indigenous culture. Examples: Diné (Navajo), Māori, Sámi

#IndigenousDay

The week focuses attention on August 9, the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. #IndigenousDay

One day does not seem sufficient. How about a week?

Origins

We launched Indigenous Peoples Week in 2011 as a direct outcome of the Indigenous Tourism and Biodiversity Website Award. ITBW Award Winner Nutti Sámi Siida and Planeta.com joined forces to hold a week-long discussion of Indigenous tourism to coincide with August 9 -- the United Nations’ International Day of the World's Indigenous People. We've had additional support Time Unlimited Tours and Madidi Jungle Ecolodge and Local Travel. We welcome other partners as this event evolves.

We have no direct links with the UN Day or the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. That said, one of the outcomes of holding Indigenous Peoples Week is to monitor how Indigenous Peoples and tourism are or are not embedded in official meetings. Our hope is that our continuing dialogue can bring attention to what is happening at the UN, the IUCN and the CBD.

We would love to have more contact with the UN, the Permanent Forum and the Convention on Biological Diversity. Indigenous Peoples Week owes a lot to the CBD for developing the IBTW Award.

Other factors in developing Indigenous Peoples Week were now 20+ year discussions with Deborah McLaren, a judge for the ITBW Award and author of the book Rethinking Tourism. In the 1990s I had long discussions with Deborah about the pros and cons of tourism as it impacted Indigenous communities. Deborah and Ron Mader have both collaborated with the US magazine/website Transitions Abroad and as a result of this work, we've always tried to embed the knowledge and tips from indigenous leaders into travel features I've written and/or published on Planeta.com.

In these past 20 years I've also led many internet workshops for local travel providers, artisans and cooks, many of whom are Indigenous. Indigenous Peoples Week thus allows a virtual reunion of sorts, encouraging continued conversations using various social web channels.

What's new in 2016?

Testing new software / social web channels including periscope and zoom

Speaking Kindly and Sweetly

One of our favorite Māori Proverbs (Whakataukī) is Kāore te kumara e kōrero ana mo tōna ake reka (The kūmara does not speak of its own sweetness.)

The take-away lesson is the need to speak (and tweet!) kindly and sweetly about Indigenous ambassadors -- artisans, guides and hosts. Indigenous Peoples Week encourages participants to speak up and tweet kudos and praise for others.

Language

Indigenous Peoples Week is open to posts in multiple languages. We encourage the use of audio and video to document the culture in the local vernacular. Record a conversation with an Indigenous friend and share the link.

Tips: Try something new.

Tips: Try reading information in a different language. We encourage the use of Google Translate. It's not perfect but it will help expand your frame of reference.

Nominations

Two Row on the Grand event article - https://tworowtimes.com/news/two-row-grand-sharing-responsibility
Pan-Am Games cultural events article - https://tworowtimes.com/arts-and-culture/must-see-events-to-celebrate-arts-and-culture-this-weekend
Six Nations Tourism new website - http://www.sixnationstourism.ca
https://aboriginalcanada.ca/corporate

UPDATE: A Framework for Indigenous Tourism: International Guidelines and Human Rights
-Submitted by Deborah McLaren, Local Flavor Deborah@mnmicro.net
Recognition of tourism issues in the Indigenous Peoples’ debate has found a place in many international guidelines. Many of these guidelines and codes have developed in response to powerful resistance by Indigenous groups to impacts of tourism development on their lives, cultures and regions and to carry out tourism development, when acceptable, on their own terms.
The ILO Convention on Indigenous and Tribal Populations, 1957 (No. 107), recognizes Indigenous peoples’ ownership of the lands they occupy and the stronger ILO Convention No. 169 that is a comprehensive instrument covering a range of issues pertaining to Indigenous and tribal peoples, including land rights, access to natural resources, health, education, vocational training, conditions of employment and contacts across borders.
Specifically on tourism, the most universally known set of guidelines for tourism development is the UNWTO Global Code of Ethics for Tourism that received official recognition by the UN General Assembly on 21 December 2001. Clause 1 of Article 1 of the Code ‘‘The understanding and promotion of the ethical values common to humanity, with an attitude of tolerance and respect for the diversity of religious, philosophical and moral beliefs, are both the foundation and the consequence of responsible tourism; stakeholders in tourism development and tourists themselves should observe the social and cultural traditions and practices of all peoples, including those of minorities and Indigenous peoples and to recognize their worth.” It further states in Article 2 “...tourism activities should respect...the individual rights of the most vulnerable groups, notably children, the elderly, the handicapped, ethnic minorities and Indigenous peoples.” The Oaxaca Declaration of the International Forum on Indigenous Tourism, adopted in 2002, is another landmark declaration recording the impacts of tourism on Indigenous communities. It asserts “primary among these is the need to recognize that Indigenous peoples are not ‘stakeholders’ and that Tourism is beneficial for Indigenous communities only when it is based on and enhances our self-determination.”
In recognition of these and wider concerns, in 2007, the United Nations created the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.
In 2012, the World Indigenous Tourism Alliance (WINTA) and the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) agreed to develop plans and programs to give practical expression, through tourism, to Indigenous rights. Guiding principles will be taken from the relevant portions of UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.
This agreement follows their common focus in fostering tourism developments consistent with the principles of the Larrakia Declaration on the Development of Indigenous Tourism that were promulgated on March 30, 2012 at the Pacific Asia Indigenous Tourism Conference 2012 in Darwin, Australia. The United Nations World Tourism Organization has also supported the Larrakia Declaration.
The United Nations (UN) General Assembly has approved the adoption of 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development. The resolution recognizes “the importance of international tourism, and particularly of the designation of an international year of sustainable tourism for development, in fostering better understanding among peoples everywhere, in leading to a greater awareness of the rich heritage of various civilizations and in bringing about a better appreciation of the inherent values of different cultures, thereby contributing to the strengthening of peace in the world.”
“The declaration by the UN of 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development is a unique opportunity to advance the contribution of the tourism sector to the three pillars of sustainability – economic, social and environmental, while raising awareness of the true dimensions of a sector which is often undervalued” said UNWTO Secretary-General, Taleb Rifai.”
This decision follows the recognition by global leaders at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) that “well-designed and well-managed tourism” can contribute to the three dimensions of sustainable development, to job creation and to trade.
The decision to adopt 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development comes at a particularly important moment as the international community embraces the new Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), approved by the UN General Assembly last September 2015. Tourism is included as targets under three of the SDGs - SDG 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all; SDG 12: Sustainable Consumption and Production and SDG 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.
Recognition of tourism issues in the Indigenous Peoples’ debate has found place in many international guidelines. Many of these guidelines and codes have developed in response to powerful resistance by Indigenous groups to impacts of tourism development on their lives, cultures and regions and to carry out tourism development, when acceptable, on their own terms.
The ILO Convention on Indigenous and Tribal Populations, 1957 (No. 107), recognizes Indigenous peoples’ ownership of the lands they occupy and the stronger ILO Convention No. 169 that is a comprehensive instrument covering a range of issues pertaining to Indigenous and tribal peoples, including land rights, access to natural resources, health, education, vocational training, conditions of employment and contacts across borders.
Specifically on tourism, the most universally known set of guidelines for tourism development is the UNWTO Global Code of Ethics for Tourism that received official recognition by the UN General Assembly on 21 December 2001. Clause 1 of Article 1 of the Code ‘‘The understanding and promotion of the ethical values common to humanity, with an attitude of tolerance and respect for the diversity of religious, philosophical and moral beliefs, are both the foundation and the consequence of responsible tourism; stakeholders in tourism development and tourists themselves should observe the social and cultural traditions and practices of all peoples, including those of minorities and Indigenous peoples and to recognize their worth.” It further states in Article 2 “...tourism activities should respect...the individual rights of the most vulnerable groups, notably children, the elderly, the handicapped, ethnic minorities and Indigenous peoples.” The Oaxaca Declaration of the International Forum on Indigenous Tourism, adopted in 2002, is another landmark declaration recording the impacts of tourism on Indigenous communities. It asserts “primary among these is the need to recognize that Indigenous peoples are not ‘stakeholders’ and that Tourism is beneficial for Indigenous communities only when it is based on and enhances our self-determination.”
In recognition of these and wider concerns, in 2007, the United Nations created the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.
In 2012, the World Indigenous Tourism Alliance (WINTA) and the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) agreed to develop plans and programs to give practical expression, through tourism, to Indigenous rights. Guiding principles will be taken from the relevant portions of UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.
This agreement follows their common focus in fostering tourism developments consistent with the principles of the Larrakia Declaration on the Development of Indigenous Tourism that were promulgated on March 30, 2012 at the Pacific Asia Indigenous Tourism Conference 2012 in Darwin, Australia. The United Nations World Tourism Organization has also supported the Larrakia Declaration.
The United Nations (UN) General Assembly has approved the adoption of 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development. The resolution recognizes “the importance of international tourism, and particularly of the designation of an international year of sustainable tourism for development, in fostering better understanding among peoples everywhere, in leading to a greater awareness of the rich heritage of various civilizations and in bringing about a better appreciation of the inherent values of different cultures, thereby contributing to the strengthening of peace in the world.”
“The declaration by the UN of 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development is a unique opportunity to advance the contribution of the tourism sector to the three pillars of sustainability – economic, social and environmental, while raising awareness of the true dimensions of a sector which is often undervalued” said UNWTO Secretary-General, Taleb Rifai”
This decision follows the recognition by global leaders at the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) that “well-designed and well-managed tourism” can contribute to the three dimensions of sustainable development, to job creation and to trade.
The decision to adopt 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development comes at a particularly important moment as the international community embraces the new Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), approved by the UN General Assembly last September 2015. Tourism is included as targets under three of the SDGs - SDG 8: Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all; SDG 12: Sustainable Consumption and Production and SDG 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.


Colombia
In the indigenous peoples week we want to share some ideas of Doris Jacanamijoy, tourism and hotel administration student at the Externado de Colombia University and member of the Kamëntsá Indigenous Community from Putumayo, Colombia.
“Today, I want to share from the elders’ stories that tourism has always been in our community without knowing and understand this concept. Now we know this concept –elders and young people- through education and media. The elders talk about the “visitor” arrival to our territory “wáman Lware”, our sacred place known as the Sibundoy Valley; they have come to know more about our ancestral medicine and our culture, and we always have welcomed them as one more part of our community.
In this way, as a member of the Kamëntsá community, I consider that tourism could be an alternative to keep working as a community which can allow as to strengthen our culture and identity in this conjuncture, where globalization is absorbing and extinguishing our identity and our culture richness.
But not everything is ok, tourism is an activity that is arriving to our communities without consultation and is imposed as a new alternative to improve our quality of life; but is something different from our vision of the world where the good living as a main thought is included. Today, tourism has come to our territory linked to individual interests, selling our culture, without taking us in account. In this fight for survival and recognition we are committed to take in our hands our history and to build from that thought the feeling and survival of our mother earth. We still remain in our territory, both Inga and Kamëntsá communities.”
Doris Jacanamijoy

Kamëntsá Indigenous Community. Putumayo, Colombia.
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=991663310946238&id=562148993897674
En la semana de los pueblos indígenas queremos compartir las ideas de Doris Jacanamijoy, estudiante de Administración Turística y Hotelera de la Universidad Externado de Colombia y miembro de la comunidad Kamëntsá de Putumayo, Colombia.
"Hoy quiero compartirles desde las historias de los mayores, que el turismo siempre ha estado en mi comunidad sin saber y entender este término; hoy es más cercano y nuevo para los mayores y para los jóvenes debido a la educación y los medios de comunicación. Los mayores siempre nos han hablado de la llegada del "visitante" a nuestro territorio "wáman Lware", nuestro lugar sagrado hoy conocido como Valle de Sibundoy, por motivos de la medicina tradicional y por conocer nuestra cultura; acogiéndolo como uno más de nuestra comunidad.
En ese sentido como miembro de la comunidad Kamëntsá, considero que el turismo es una alternativa para trabajar en comunitariedad, y que nos permitirá fortalecernos como pueblo y trabajar nuestra cultural en tiempos coyunturales, donde la globalización nos absorbe y extingue nuestra identidad y toda la riqueza cultural.
Pero no todo está bien, el turismo es una actividad que está llegando a los pueblos originarios con intereses particulares vendiendo nuestra cultura y sin una consulta previa, y se nos impone como el nuevo desarrollo para mejorar la calidad de vida; algo muy distinto a nuestras cosmovisiones donde conjugamos el pensamiento del buen vivir. En esa lucha de supervivencia y de reconocimiento estamos obligados a ser actores de nuestra propia historia y construir desde el pensamiento, el sentir y el vivir de la madre tierra. Nuestras comunidades permanecen aún en el territorio, aún perviven la Inga y la Kamëntsá."
Doris Jacanamijoy


Comunidad Kamëntsá. Putumayo, Colombia.
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=991662464279656&id=562148993897674


Levels of Engagement

We have come up with five simple levels of engagement that apply to successful participation. If you want to be engaged, the basic ideas apply to any event: be attentive, be creative, be generous, be curious and be empathetic.

Be attentive: Go outside, visit a museum, learn about Indigenous culture. Do stuff!

Be creative: Use the social web to share stories and ask questions. Make something! Examples: Make a Flickr gallery or Pinterest album. Upload a video to YouTube or presentation to Slideshare.

Be generous: Add stars to other people’s photos or make a gallery of your faves, like comments on Facebook, give a thumbs up to videos on YouTube and have a heart by favoriting the Indigenous Peoples Week presentation on Slideshare. Be kind!

Be curious: Look for examples of Indigenous tourism that surprise you. This might be in your own country or in the place where you are planning a vacation.

Be empathetic: Extend your compassion to what and who you see.

Players

Conference organizers - If you are holding an event that features indigenous tourism, provide summaries or announcements
Government officials - Prepare blogs, tweets, flickr albums and Slideshare presentations about your work in Indigenous travel
Bloggers, Journalists, Guidebook Authors and Publishers - Ask questions that you'd like assistance. Afterwards, please keep us updated on how you are using the information.
Students - Share news with your teachers and classmates. Print out the free posters for your classroom or academic notice board.
Teachers - Share news with your students and colleagues. Print out the free posters for your classroom or academic message board.
Travel companies, guides, hotels, restaurants - Add photos to Flickr, videos to YouTube and show us specific examples of your work; print the free posters (below) for your business; create your own poster; offer discounts to visitors who mention Indigenous Peoples Week; encourage your clients to use the social web to provide testimonials of what you do well; tweet about specific actions and provide links where we can find details
Trusted colleagues - Editors, please help clarify the text and translate the info on this page; update other Planeta Wiki pages that we can spotlight
Sponsors - Contact Ron.

Recommended Listening

Top of our #IPW6 playlist

The Sweetness of the Kumara - Kāore te kumara e kōrero ana mo tōna ake reka. The kumara does not brag about its own sweetness. This whakataukī has a number of interpretations. For some people it is a helpful reminder to be humble and to practise humility. For others arguably it is a hindrance, a reminder that you should not be seen as boastful, or bragging, perhaps taking the notion of humility to the extreme. In the first of this four-part series, Te Ahi Kaa looks at a few whakataukī (proverbs) that are often heard today explored further with a series of interviews to find out other people’s interpretations of these and their place in Māori society.



Indigenous tourism: preserving culture and creating jobs - One operator, in Western Australia's southwest, is converting the most unlikely of places into a tourism and training venture. outbounding

Links to IPW6

http://outbounding.org/articles/view/four-winds-recognition-of-indigenous-tourism-leadership
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1608/S00087/planetacom-opens-indigenous-peoples-week-2016.htm
http://outbounding.org/articles/view/registration-is-open-for-indigenous-peoples-week-ipw6
https://www.facebook.com/groups/rtnetworking/permalink/10155023344127388
https://www.facebook.com/groups/GlobalEcotourismNetwork/permalink/1405838142775900



YouTube



Talking Points: Guelaguetza and Te Matatini, Compare and Contrast

To better understand these events, we’re asking readers to compare and contrast the annual Guelaguetza celebration in Mexico to the biannual Te Matatini in New Zealand. One aspect of the Kiwi celebration we particularly like is that English-language translation service is broadcast on local radio and streamed online so that those who do not understand the Māori language have some interpretation, a service sorely lacking with Guelaguetza. During Indigenous Peoples Week we will be updating this section.

Event
Guelaguetza
Te Matatini
Description


Translation in English?
No
Online radio and Internet
More info
Also see
https://storify.com/ronmader/guelaguetza
Also see
https://storify.com/ronmader/tematatini


#Guelaguetza2016
#TeMatini

Featured Hashtags

#PaisajeLingüístico
#usatuvoz (also see the oaxaca wiki)



Special Dates

August 9 International Day of the World's Indigenous People

Wiki: Indigenous World

indigenous
ITBW Award
Aboriginal Australia
Ecuador's indigenous people
Hopi
Māori
Diné (Navajo)
Quechua
Sami - Swedish Lapland

Wiki: Indigenous Mexico

Indigenous peoples of Oaxaca
Mexico's Indigenous Foods (Carta de Comida Indígena)
ayuuk (mixe)
Chinanteco
Maya
Mixtec
Zapotec

Place Pages that have been edited thanks to Indigenous Peoples Week

World:
australia - queensland - perth - sydney
colombia
ecuador
indonesia
mexico - cancun - yucatan
new zealand - Māori proverbs
sweden

USA:
alaska
arizona
california
colorado
indiana
minnesota
nevada
new hampshire
new mexico
wisconsin


Day One
Day 1! Welcome to Indigenous Peoples Week, 2016. Hashtag: #ipw6

Our conversations are about to unfold on Facebook as well as Twitter and other social channels. Don't worry. All of this is curated on this page http://planeta.wikispaces.com/indiweek2016
Monday: Livestreaming via FacebookLive
https://www.facebook.com/events/1635740993418517

Requests:
If you have not done so already, please register
https://indiweek2016.eventbrite.com

• Please introduce yourself and your interest or questions about Indigenous Tourism.

• Do you know of a person or organization doing great work with Indigenous Tourism? Nominate them for the #IPW6 award!

• Do you have a beloved craft made by an Indigenous artisan? Share a photo and let others know how to get in contact.

Some background: The objective of #IPW6 is two-fold: to raise awareness of Indigenous tourism options around the world and to improve digital literacy skills among the Indigenous tourism providers themselves.

A special round of thanks to our friends and partners, Nutti Sámi Siida, TIME Unlimited, Madidi Jungle Ecolodge and The Travel Word and supporting fans Transitions Abroad and Outbounding.org. Kudos for bringing us together in first place the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Artwork / Cue Yourself

Indigenous Peoples Week, August 8-14 #ipw6

Misc


http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs141p2_024362.pdf

To paraphrase John Cutty, changing the power balance in tourism is ultimately about ... changing the culture of tourism.

Question: Are there any awards for Indigenous Tourism expertise?

http://gifninja.com/animated-gifs/153066/indigenous-peoples-week

A call to the four corners and four winds of the earth. Do you know of a person or organization doing great work with Indigenous Tourism? Nominate them for the Indigenous People's Week Four Winds Recognition. Nominations are open until September 10:
https://goo.gl/forms/ooMM5tpkfXkQIQHB3





Mexico


Sweden

Sámi Márkan Jukkasjärvi 2016



http://www.sbs.com.au/nitv/songlines-on-screen/article/2016/04/29/landmark-documentary-series-songlines-screen-coming-soon


Participants are asked to
promote the event beforehand in face-to-face conversation, online your own social web channels and to share / like / heart other people's #ipw6 posts. A little encouragement goes a long way! develop an online presentation to be shared during Indigenous Peoples Week. The presentation can be as simple or as complex as you'd like. It could be a YouTube video, a Flickr album, a YouTube playlist or a Slideshare presentation. Give us something we can embed and promote. participate in live public video before and during the week. We'd love to see your #Periscope and #FacebookLIve videos. suggest edits for Planeta.com, Change the world
docs.google.com/document/d/1YQZmkGlIYI1j2vPTbuF-XvLbiKCWJoM102DkncSSTes
host or join local events on the ground. have fun. It's not working if we're not enjoying our conversation.••



Nominees may include:
Indigenous Artisan
Indigenous-Owned Restaurants and Food Service
Indigenous-Owned Travel Company
Non-Indigenous-Owned Travel Company
Government working toward Indigenous tourism.

Conceive, Believe, Achieve, Receive.

Spanish:
Una llamada a las cuatro esquinas y cuatro vientos de la tierra. ¿Conoces una organización o una persona haciendo un gran trabajo con el turismo indígena? Designar a estos líderes de Four Winds Recognition (Reconocimiento Cuatro Vientos) seleccionados por Planeta.com, Nutti Sami Siida, TIME Unlimited, Madidi Jungle Ecolodge y The Travel Word. Las nominaciones están abiertas hasta Sep 10. Los finalistas anunciados antes del Día Mundial del Turismo (27 de septiembre).